Items filtered by date: November 2017

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Monday, 27 November 2017 00:00

What is an Ingrown Toenail?

If you are experiencing pain, redness, and swelling near the toenail, chances are you may have an ingrown toenail. Ingrown toenails occur when the corner of the nail grows into the flesh, which can be very painful. Diabetics may be at a greater risk for ingrown toenails due to poor blood flow which can lead to the wound not healing. Trimming toenails properly is an excellent way to help prevent ingrown toenails. Wearing well-fitted shoes can help too; keeping pressure off the toes may keep the nail from growing into the surrounding tissue. Soaking the feet in a warm bath may relieve tenderness and reduce swelling, and applying antibiotic cream and bandaging the toe can also be beneficial. If the toenail becomes infected or the pain is severe, it is recommended that you see a podiatrist.

Ingrown toenails can become painful if they are not treated properly. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact our podiatrists of Michigan Foot and Ankle. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails occur when a toenail grows sideways into the bed of the nail, causing pain, swelling, and possibly infection.

Causes

  • Bacterial infections
  • Improper nail cutting such as cutting it too short or not straight across
  • Trauma to the toe, such as stubbing, which causes the nail to grow back irregularly
  • Ill-fitting shoes that bunch the toes too close together
  • Genetic predisposition

Prevention

Because ingrown toenails are not something found outside of shoe-wearing cultures, going barefoot as often as possible will decrease the likeliness of developing ingrown toenails. Wearing proper fitting shoes and using proper cutting techniques will also help decrease your risk of developing ingrown toenails.

Treatment

Ingrown toenails are a very treatable foot condition. In minor cases, soaking the affected area in salt or antibacterial soaps will not only help with the ingrown nail itself, but also help prevent any infections from occurring. In more severe cases, surgery is an option. In either case, speaking to your podiatrist about this condition will help you get a better understanding of specific treatment options that are right for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Michigan. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 20 November 2017 00:00

Why Are My Feet Cold?

The feet may feel cold when there are environmental stresses, such as the temperature dropping. This may cause oxygen deficiency and turn the feet blue in color, a condition called cyanosis. When the natural circulation is restored, this condition disappears. There are other causes of poor blood circulation, including the inability to produce normal levels of red blood cells, commonly known as anemia. Typically, improvement may be achieved through diet, in addition to taking nutritional supplements. Diabetes may be another cause, and this disease can have very serious effects on the feet. It may result in nerve damage, causing the feet to feel cold. If your feet feel cold a lot of the time, a consultation with a podiatrist may be advised.

Poor circulation is a serious condition and needs immediate medical attention. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact our podiatrists of Michigan Foot and Ankle. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs is can be caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD), which is the result of a buildup of plaque in the arteries.

Plaque buildup or atherosclerosis results from excess calcium and cholesterol in the bloodstream. This can restrict the amount of blood which can flow through the arteries. Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs are sometimes caused by inflammation in the blood vessels, known as vasculitis.

Causes

Lack of oxygen and oxygen from poor blood circulation restricts muscle growth and development. It can also cause:

  • Muscle pain, stiffness, or weakness   
  • Numbness  or cramping in the legs 
  • Skin discoloration
  • Slower nail & hair growth
  • Erectile dysfunction

Those who have diabetes or smoke are at greatest risk for poor circulation, as are those who are over 50. If you have poor circulation in the feet and legs it may be caused by PAD, and is important to make changes to your lifestyle in order to reduce risk of getting a heart attack or stroke. Exercise and maintaining a healthy lifestyle will dramatically improve conditions.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Michigan. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Poor Blood Circulation in the Feet
Sunday, 12 November 2017 00:00

Causes and Treatment of Foot Pain

It’s common to have pain in your feet after standing all day. By eliminating foot discomfort, your muscles will be more relaxed. While standing on concrete, your legs will feel more uncomfortable than if you were to stand on soft carpet. Aches and pain in the feet should not be ignored, as this may a sign of potentially serious foot conditions. There are a few causes of sore feet, a common one being not enough support in the shoes. Another cause may be ill-fitting shoes that are too small. To avoid pain in the foot, shoes should be supportive and comfortable. Making sure to stretch the feet can also be a great way to mitigate pain from prolonged standing. Getting a regular foot massage may also help. The benefits of a massage can include boosting energy levels in addition to alleviating foot pain. However, a foot massage is only a temporary solution. If you feel constant pain in your feet, it is recommended that you see a podiatrist.

While working on the feet, it is important to take the proper care of them. For more information about working on your feet, contact our podiatrists from Michigan Foot and Ankle. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Working on Your Feet

Standing on your feet for long periods of time can cause stress and pain in your feet. Your whole body may experience change in terms of posture, back pain, bunions, callouses and or plantar warts. There are ways to avoid these conditions with proper foot care, smart choices and correct posture.

Positive Changes

Negative heeled shoe – Choosing this shoe type places the heel slightly lower than the ball of the foot. These are great for overall foot health. Find shoes that fit you correctly.

Go barefoot – Our feet were not designed to be enclosed for all hours of the day. Try to periodically expose your feet to air.

Eliminate Pain

Foot Exercises – Performing simple exercises, incorporating yoga and doing stretches are beneficial. This will allow increased blood flow to the area and muscles of the foot.

Achilles tendon – Stretching the foot out flat on the floor will relax the calf muscles and tendon. These exercises can be performed almost anywhere. Make sure you add these exercises to your daily regimen. 

With a little bit of this information and knowing more about foot health, you will notice changes. Foot stretches and proper footwear will help with pain and prevent further issues.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Michigan. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 06 November 2017 00:00

What to Know About a Broken Toe

One of the first signs you will most likely notice if your toe is broken is a throbbing pain. It may also change color and look bruised. Typically, you may have difficulty putting weight on your toe and walking may be painful or even unbearable. You may even hear the bone break at the time of injury. There are a few common causes of a broken toe, almost always being a type of trauma or injury. Stubbing your toe into something hard or something dropping on it are two very common ways to break a toe. Going barefoot is something you may want to avoid, especially in a dark or unfamiliar area. If you lift heavy objects often then proper foot protection is needed, such as thick boots. If you believe the toe is broken, an X-ray conducted by a podiatrist will likely be taken to receive a proper diagnosis and treatment.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact our podiatrists from Michigan Foot and Ankle. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of one of our offices located in Michigan. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What to Know About a Broken Toe
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